Posts Tagged ‘defense strategy’

Playing Games with Client’s Lives

Friday, January 28th, 2011

 

Criminal law is about as serious as it gets.  Our clients’ liberty, reputations, freedoms, rights, opportunities, property — and even their lives — are at risk.  What we do affects not just our clients, but their children, their parents, the victims, and the community at large.  What we do is not a game.

So why do so many defense lawyers play games?  Cute little tactics, essentially dishonest, which never work.  All it seems to do is hurt their clients.  And yet they persist.  Boggles the mind.

Our job is to minimize the penalty our clients must suffer — preferably none whatsoever.  We do that by giving prosecutors new ways of looking at the situation, by challenging the legality of evidence, by showing juries that the evidence doesn’t mean what the government says it meant, and by skillful negotiation.

We do not accomplish that by, for example, routinely filing cross-grand-jury notice in NYC without having discussed with our clients whether they’d even consider testifying in the grand jury, doing so solely for the purpose of getting a prosecutor to call, or just to jam up the prosecutor to make their life difficult.  At the very least, it pisses off the prosecutor, who is less likely to give a decent offer as a result.  An offer might be taken off the table entirely, on the grounds that nobody who thinks they’re innocent should plead to anything.  The lawyer loses credibility, is seen as basically dishonest, and so it’s harder for him to negotiate a better deal or persuade the prosecution that they might have it wrong in this case.

We do not accomplish that by making cute little arguments in court that have no chance of success, and only serve to piss off the judge.  Once again, the lawyer loses credibility, comes to be seen as dishonest, and so it’s harder to win legal arguments that actually have merit down the road.  It only does the client a disservice.

We’re not going to give a laundry list of examples.  Every courthouse has its own idiosyncrasies.  But you get the point.  There’s nothing wrong with taking advantage of rules and procedures to the client’s best advantage, but nothing is gained if that’s done in a dishonest manner.  The client actually loses.

The better practice is to be (more…)

A Tactical Wheel for the Defense?

Sunday, November 28th, 2010

Every defense attorney has their own favorite metaphor for what we do.  Some talk of it like a street fight, envisioning a slugfest with the cops or the court or DA (or all three).  Others speak as if it’s a poker game (with the other side usually holding all the aces).  Occasionally, we even hear chess analogies.  Well, for whatever reason, we tend to think in fencing terms.

On the one hand, this makes little sense, as we haven’t fenced much since our kids started coming along.  (Literally.  Our wife went into labor with the first one right in the middle of us getting trounced by some French guy in an épée tournament.)  But on the other hand, we do find the analogy extremely useful.

Like fencing, much of what we do is reactive.  There’s something they teach fencers called the “tactical wheel” which starts off with a simple attack, which gets countered by a parry and riposte, which gets countered by a feint, which gets countered by a counterattack into the feint, and so on until you’re reacting with a simple attack.  You’re always reacting to what your opponent did, and trying to use your reaction to score off him instead.  That’s pretty much what we do.

Note that each reaction is not merely a defensive parry.  If all you’re doing is deflecting attacks, you can never win.  Eventually, one of them’s going to get through.  Every defensive action is an attack of some sort.  You win by taking the game to the other guy.  You go on the offense.  Make the other side react to you.  The best defense, as always, is a good offense.

And as in fencing, you pretty much have to take your opponent as you find him.  Different tactics are going to work with different situations.  It’s nice to know what works when.

That whole “tactical wheel” thing only really works, of course, if both you and your opponent are of intermediate skill.  A novice doesn’t always do the smart thing, which throws such rote tactics into disarray.  An expert, with a zen-like empty mind, is not hindered by the rule of thumb, and is free to react to this particular action in the most effective way.  Still, there is something to be said for a rule of thumb.  When all else fails, you have something to fall back on, which at the very least assures you of a solid, workmanlike job.  It may not be elegant, but the odds are safe.  And with the vast majority of opponents, it’s going to be all you need.

So what would such a tactical wheel look like for criminal defense?

It’s not going to be as (more…)

Something to Tide You Over

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

writer-boxed-flipped

We apologize to our loyal readers for the unusual delay between posts. We’ve been on trial, and you know how that goes. Trial is all-consuming. And then there’s all the work that piles up in the meantime. And the wife and kids need a token appearance from us once in a while. So the blog just isn’t happening while we’re on trial.

And that’s how it should be, of course.

So yeah, we’ve been on trial since November 2. We keep predicting that it will end soon, but it never does. With any luck, we’ll have closing arguments tomorrow. But we said the same thing yesterday, and on Friday, and on Thursday… And we’re going to have to take Thursday off if the jury’s still not back with a verdict then, because we’re giving our next “Hope for Hopeless Cases” lecture for West Legal Ed Center that day. So yeah, this case could easily last through Friday.

To tide you over until we finally get a chance to blog again, here’s a link to our latest article in Forbes magazine.

Link

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Excerpt:
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Expert View
BEAR STEARNS DEFENSE HOLDS LESSONS FOR EXECS

Going on offense is the best defense in white-collar cases.

It didn’t take long after the housing boom turned bust and trillions of dollars of wealth had gone poof that the public was out for blood. The government needed to “do something” about the mess.

An obvious point of focus were the securities firms Bear Stearns (now a part of JPMorgan Chase) and Lehman Brothers (now a part of Barclays) which blew up in quick succession. From there, it does not take a huge leap of logic to understand how federal prosecutors set their sights on Ralph Cioffi and Matt Tannin, two former managers of Bear hedge funds who were plucked out of obscurity, paraded through a perp walk and unceremoniously read their rights as criminal defendants.

As their Nov. 10 acquittals attest, they didn’t actually commit any crimes. But that didn’t spare them from two years of hell during which they were investigated, indicted, vilified, prosecuted and put on trial. If they’d lost, that would have all been a picnic compared with the 20 years of prison time they would have faced.

If the case teaches us anything, it’s that such ordeals can befall executives–innocent and otherwise. If enough things go wrong on their watch, it’s not all that rare for bosses to find gung-ho prosecutors eager to indict them before all the facts are in.

That leads to the question: What can you do to protect yourself if you fall under the eye of a suspicious prosecutor? Here, the Bear Stearns case is instructive.

Lesson One
You’re on your own. If you ever find yourself on the receiving end of an indictment related to your professional activities, don’t count on your…

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